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IAP Crypto- Bio- Innovation Part1 Jan 27 2022 - Shared screen with speaker view
Paula C. Arias
18:05
Good morning
Vinnie Brown
22:54
My partner Greg Carron is on this call. He and I are building and developing NFTS for my group
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
31:10
https://calendar.mit.edu/event/inclusive_bio-_and_crypto-_in_innovation_how_law_and_technology_co-evolve_part_i
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
32:32
A valid criticism of transparency of NFTs
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
32:33
https://moxie.org/2022/01/07/web3-first-impressions.html
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
35:55
https://www.naughtybynature.com/
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
42:31
For Vinnie and Gregory: how much of the technology aspects do you do yourself and how much is outsourced. How do you outsource (e.g. ewallet) and how do you parse who to trust with software for accessing the blockchain, maintaining and updating your data over years to come?
Dionisio Antonio Mulone
46:31
For Vinnie Brown & Gregory Carron: I've got two main questions:1) What would make one piece of art minted in the Tezos blockchain more authoritative than the same piece minted in the Ethereum blockchain? Given the decentralized nature of the technology, do we have any tools to protect the rights of artists in cases of copyright infringement or bad faith?2) Regarding royalties. How do you think, from a legal perspective, we should tackle the technique of avoiding paying them by not categorizing the movement of the NFT as a "transaction" and merely as "movement"?
Lydia Koraki
46:36
For Vinnie and Gregory: are you concerned about the scope of fans you reach with NFTs? YouTube is used by all ages- is this possible with the technicality of NFT?
Kristina Kazazaeva
49:13
For Patrycja: how can we (lawyers together with IT experts) assist the States in introducing effective regulation? Should it be done on international level for example in the form of working out model laws or other forms of international regulation?
Cassandra Nedder
49:31
For Vinnie and Gregory: Do you anticipate artists primarily using NFTs to sell individual songs, or primarily as a space to “crowd source” funds for albums, offering NFT owners a percentage of the royalties in return? Additionally, if you know any individuals or groups still represented by record labels, have you heard any significant pushback from record labels, or any potential desire to offer to help artists create these NFTs?
Harpreet Dhillon
52:40
Kristina — On your qn, I personally think models laws or international codes are inevitable. They just may not come fast enough as states have begun to regulate.
Kristina Kazazaeva
53:49
Thank you, Patricia, for sharing your ideas on this issue!
Mariia Sholokhova
54:35
To Patrycja Treder; do you believe that states may conclude a unified act on crypto/blockchain regulations? Should they do it? (Foe example, should there be a unified law in the EU or separate laws in the EU states?)
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:01:30
Harpreet Dhillon will be next as she is in Singapore and very late at night there
Brenden Maher
01:05:58
3-4 minutes ??
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:06:14
Harpreet Dhillon is the Lead Counsel in Safety, Content and Law Enforcement @ Twitter
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:11:41
Prof Şebnem Akipek Öcal will be next
Marianna Kleyman
01:12:31
to Paula: Who makes decisions on the risk to society and who's ethics should be followed with internationally-reaching laws? How much weight do we give to environmental versus health versus safety concerns? How do you make a law to regulate something that is likely going to be harmful to general health in the long run (20-40 years), but very good for business in the short term (5-10 years)?
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:17:16
Attorney Jared L. Hubbard will be next
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
01:19:27
To Sebnem: do you think your government’s restriction on payment by crypto is similar to China’s wholesale ban? in motivation and/or implementation?
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:22:33
Andras Patkai will be next
Marianna Kleyman
01:25:22
how effective are bans or severe restrictions on crypto use in the countries that have enacted them? Is the result to push crypto into primarily illegal activities and empower mob-like individuals & organizations?
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:27:36
ERNE FUCHS will be next
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
01:27:50
To Jared Hubbard: check out Avery Gilbert’s testimony in cases where police used their own olfactory sensors (noses) to perform searches. Also check out the Nasal Ranger technology and how human noses can be used in an objective way assisted by technology and evidence thus collected is being used in court cases revolving around olfactory pollution (homeowners can sue neighbors if they create a nuisance smell)
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
01:29:42
https://www.nytimes.com/2022/01/13/climate/nasal-ranger-chuck-mcginley.html?campaign_id=61&emc=edit_ts_20220113&instance_id=50237&nl=the-great-read&regi_id=58958179&segment_id=79635&te=1&user_id=82d44aa03bab3e42a7dbd5518a3ed939
Dionisio Antonio Mulone
01:29:57
A question for Mr. Patkai. How does the technology you mentioned adapts to "forking"? (i.e. -> two groups of validators disagree on the contents of the blockchain so two new are created or one "wins" and the other one is scratched out). What happens when the validation or the contract is minted or mined in a blockchain which is later erased due to differences in validation? How can we as lawyers work for larger legal security in such a volatile situation?
Dionisio Antonio Mulone
01:31:19
(Given the authentication happens offline and there's a central authority the question has been answered).
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
01:34:11
to Andras Patkai: if there is a central authority, what is the role of decentralized architecture if any? How is this different than any other proprietary data storage system?
Jorge Aponte Gómez
01:35:23
i agree
Lydia Koraki
01:36:28
To Andras Patkai: Who has the responsibility to maintain the archival documentation in a server? Where does the liability fall upon in case of technical problem/fraud/hacking?
Jorge Aponte Gómez
01:38:29
Very nice presentation. It makes me nervous 🙂
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:40:15
DR. ISTVÁN ERDŐS from Hungary will be next as it is late in Europe
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
01:40:18
To all: if there is an international court how does it adjudicate local issues? If not all countries are signed up as is the case with most international treaties how do we prevent criminals simply moving their online operations to servers located in countries that have not signed agreements?
Basak Toker
01:42:58
To Sebnem Akipek: You said the government will probably lift the ban soon. When we take the new currency-protection bank accounts and the other precautions they announced into consideration, do you think the cryptocurrencies will be seen as a “currency”? If so, wouldn’t this encourage keeping the ban even longer?
Marianna Kleyman
01:43:02
when you have a clear connection between data and behavior (or some other clear readout) making it a metric is relatively simple. How do you judge how good your data analysis is when you're synthesizing multiple types of data into, say, a criminal's profile? What happens when new data shows you've made a mistake in an underlying principle of your analysis algorithm?
Andras Patkai
01:43:57
"Who has the responsibility to maintain the archival documentation in a server? Where does the liability fall upon in case of technical problem/fraud/hacking?" The Central Authority (government, issuer of identity documents or bank accounts) has the responsibility. The higher the authority, the higher the physical and cyber protection can be of the database they manage anyway.
Dionisio Antonio Mulone
01:44:41
To Andres. International Criminal Law follows a different logic in order to tackle similar (tangentially) issues. If the crime is comited on the server of a country not party to the convention BUT it affects the citizens of or has effects on the territory of a signatory party, that hypothetical tribunal, derived from that hypothetical convention, would probably be competent.
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:46:28
Sophia Kampanis will be next
Andras Patkai
01:48:35
"if there is a central authority, what is the role of decentralized architecture if any? How is this different than any other proprietary data storage system?" - The 2 systems coexist, decentralized blockchains provide public access and transparency about the existence of transactions. However the central authority is where data is actually stored and protected from fraud. DataQR is not a data storage system, it is an authentication technology that may be overlaid existing data storage systems to make them more compliant, safe, and reliable.
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:52:29
Justin Holmes will be next
Begüm Yılmaz
01:52:32
For biotechnology, biological data is crucial to progress further. Sharing and accessing biological data is not easy due to the importance of ethical use and data protection. Do you think current sensitivity to data is wasting scientists' time while dealing with biotechnological developments?
Andras Patkai
01:53:13
Dionisio: "How does the technology you mentioned adapts to "forking"? (i.e. -> two groups of validators disagree on the contents of the blockchain so two new are created or one "wins" and the other one is scratched out). What happens when the validation or the contract is minted or mined in a blockchain which is later erased due to differences in validation? How can we as lawyers work for larger legal security in such a volatile situation? (Given the authentication happens offline and there's a central authority the question has been answered)." - Exactly, DataQR provides a layer of authentication detached from the blockchain, so if there's a forking for example, by verifying an identity and status (ownership of a digital asset), a customer who carries their own data gets validation from a central authority.
Dionisio Antonio Mulone
01:55:21
Thank you Andras!
Dimitrios Ioannidis
01:57:53
Kathryn Dickieson will be next
Marianna Kleyman
01:58:19
@Begum I do not find the current sensitivity towards accessing biodata wastes time, it is critical to keep perspective on what we are working with and why. Good regulation forces scientists to phrase their experimental questions accurately, which improves the chances of a "useful" result. The problems come when there are multiple different rules for effectively the same type of data depending on where it originated from. In addition, the data itself isn't as useful as the metadata attached - be that clinical information that comes with a DNA sample or the bioinformatic analyses that have been run on the sample in the context of a larger sample set in an experimental setup.
Andras Patkai
01:58:54
"International Criminal Law follows a different logic in order to tackle similar (tangentially) issues. If the crime is comited on the server of a country not party to the convention BUT it affects the citizens of or has effects on the territory of a signatory party, that hypothetical tribunal, derived from that hypothetical convention, would probably be competent." - The question is whether you can catch and identify the criminal. Here is where authentication comes in, identification in the digital world, which defeats the purpose of the myth of the freedom of the Internet. It's a sensitive subject, grey area.
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
01:59:12
Indeed the annotation and metadata bring huge value but of course that value cannot exist without the primary biodata stream
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
01:59:47
Dimitri is referring to: www.osmocosm.org
Dimitrios Ioannidis
02:00:24
Marianna Kleyman will be next
Paula C. Arias
02:01:10
The question on the ICC is about reaching the subject matter prongs. The territorial prong on jurisdiction is not dispositive of the place where the conduct in question occurs, if victims are nationals of a State Member, the ICC may have jurisdiction.
Patrycja Treder
02:01:53
To Kristina Kazazaeva: the lawyers and IT experts may firstly assist the states in regulating the innovation by starting the public discussion, including by simply publishing the articles and so on. On top of that, when the regulatory process is going on, sometimes the stakeholders are invited to comment on the draft regulations. Also, some states - in the course of regulation - create a group of experts for preparing a particular regulation. Inevitably, I believe we will need at least the soft law regulation at the international level.
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
02:08:07
Check out this effort for biodata ownership
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
02:08:07
https://www.openhumans.org/
Kathryn Dickieson (She/Her)
02:10:01
The book I read from is by Alan Watts and is called The Book
Mia Bonardi
02:10:30
Thank you Mariannna!
Patrycja Treder
02:10:39
To Mariia Sholokhova: I believe that the most suitable to prepare the international soft law regulation will be a specialised international body. Then, the states can become inspired by such a soft law regulation. Looking at the past experience, I do not believe that it is possible that all states will agree on one international regulation. Finally, coming to the European Union, once the European Union implements a regulation, then the EU Member States will have to comply. If the national law of the EU Member States is not compliant with the EU regulation, the EU Member States will be obliged to make their national laws in line with the EU regulation.
Andras Patkai
02:12:13
That was very well framed, Marianna, We all have much more data than we can process...
Paula C. Arias
02:13:31
The idea of having an international framework, treaty or model law/regulation, is concerted by different international stakeholders, which helps to address the considerations of bias or partisan But reaching that concerted content is not easy to achieve.
Cassandra Nedder
02:15:59
Thank you very much!!
Andras Patkai
02:18:13
The plans are that Russians can own, only not use within the country, as I understand.
Andras Patkai
02:20:52
Mariia is hitting the nail on the head.
Mariia Sholokhova
02:21:16
Somebody had to say that :)
Paula C. Arias
02:23:28
Thank you very much for the invitation. As a lawyer and a law professor, I appreciate the different perspectives, and I have learned a lot.
Denis Kudriashov
02:25:31
Have to drop for today to make next meeting. Thank you all, Andreas and Dimitri for a great discussion. Vinnie, thank YOU for your music. Down with O.P.P. since 1991, huge fan! See everyone tomorrow!
Şebnem Akipek
02:26:37
That was a wonderful panel. I learned a lot. I hope to join tomorrow as well. Now I have to leave and hope to see you all tomorrow.
Mariia Sholokhova
02:27:06
Thank you!
Kathryn Dickieson (She/Her)
02:27:23
I second everything Denis just said! Have a wonderful day everyone!
Brenden Maher
02:30:06
I can answer the health data question….
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
02:30:21
highly relevant To Julia’s question and Andras reply:https://moxie.org/2022/01/07/web3-first-impressions.html
Gregory Carron
02:31:45
Individual IPFS/decentralized cloud storage services will be interesting. Much more fear around the hacking of popular NFT storage like Pinata, Arweave. Great points Andras.
Brenden Maher
02:32:05
In the US you do not own your Heath Data
Cassandra Nedder
02:33:02
I have to log off—but Thank you so much to all of the panelists!! This was invigorating and eye-opening. Thank you for your time!
Andras Patkai
02:33:41
Sorry, I need to get on another call, see you tomorrow.
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
02:34:18
“In the US you do not own your Heath Data” and there it is! “THE Problem"
Gregory Carron
02:36:23
Sorry, have another meeting approaching. Thank you for the opportunity to hear such valuable opinions. See everyone tomorrow.
Marianna Kleyman
02:42:11
thank you for a great panel discussion, I have another meeting coming up, looking forward to continuing tomorrow :)
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
02:44:00
All the comments in one copy=pastable chunk
Dr. Andreas Mershin (MIT)
02:44:01
In the US you do not own your Heath Data
Brenden Maher
02:44:48
brenden@media.mit.edu